International Door & Operator Industry

SEP-OCT 2017

Garage door industry magazine for garage door dealers, garage door manufacturers, garage door distributors, garage door installers, loading docks, garage door operators and openers, gates, and tools for the door industry.

Issue link: http://idoi.epubxp.com/i/866076

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V O L U M E 5 0 I S S U E 5 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 7 53 I have been doing customer tech support for 35 years and feel it is time to share a revelation I had while being hospitalized. There is so much room in our industry for improvement it is mind-boggling. The process from ordering an operator to installing the unit has many pitfalls,traps, and inconsistencies where job failure can occur. Most door people are competent with door installation, but this is not necessarily so with operator installations, so these thoughts are aimed at residential, commercial, and gate operators. NOW FOR THAT REVELATION: What's shocking to me is I didn't think of it decades ago. Yes, sometimes an operator component may malfunction, but most of the time the origin of a failure starts on the day of installation. The truth is basically incomplete or incorrect installations are the reason for most faults and failures down the road. There is so much misinformation in our industry it is almost at an epidemic stage. Recently I was on a tech call with a door dealer asking why he had to hold the close button in to close the door. News Flash--if you do not install a compatible approved entrapment protection device on a residential or commercial door operator, it will revert to constant hold on the close button. Upon further investigation the door dealer told me the electrician said the door should reverse when he held out his hand and thought the photo-sensor was optional and a waste of time. In reality the electrician did not include wiring the photo-sensors in his quote and tried to weasel out of the work. I don't know where people get their ideas, but I imagine they make stuff up when they don't know the real answer. The installer, salesman who sold the job, and the company owner all thought the "electrician must be right" and me wrong! This flustered me, so to fix it all I had to communicate directly with the electrician, insult him a few times, and coach him through the wiring whereas he resisted my every suggestion. By Roy Bardowell Continued on page 54 TECHNICAL The Truth About TROUBLESHOOTING "Yes, sometimes an operator component may malfunction, but most of the time the origin of a failure starts on the day of installation. The truth is basically incomplete or incorrect installations are the reason for most faults and failures down the road."

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