International Door & Operator Industry

JAN-FEB 2018

Garage door industry magazine for garage door dealers, garage door manufacturers, garage door distributors, garage door installers, loading docks, garage door operators and openers, gates, and tools for the door industry.

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MANAGEMENT V O L U M E 5 1 I S S U E 1 F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 71 (Continued from page 68) college, obtain a four-year degree and a job would be almost guaranteed. For the most part, that was true. Then recession, inflation and technological advances took away many "guaranteed" jobs. We made the same promise to our children: Go to college and you'll get a job. It isn't as true today as it was 40 years ago. In this day of instant gratification, young people want to live at the same economic level of their parents. They don't realize the time it took to struggle and save to be at that level. While they may wind up more in debt, the odds of them having the luxuries they grew up with immediately are slim to none. Not everyone will graduate as a Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates (by the way, both of them dropped out of Harvard!). Matthew Wisner writes, "Now, if you think there is a job shortage, I have some great news for you, but it may not be the news you want to hear." Mike Rowe, television personality (famous for the series "Dirty Jobs"), says that if you want a job, you probably should not go to a four-year college. You should consider a trade school. Construction and contracting leaders in the US and Canada often struggle filling positions with competent skilled workers. Wisner quotes Rowe, "$1.3 million dollars in student loans is not the answer. We have a subordinate view of these trade jobs. There is no hope without an education, … you have to have some competency." "But the idea that the best path for most people just happens to be the most expensive path, there's just something fundamentally corrupt," Rowe told the FOX Business Network's Stuart Varney. "The cost of college has just gone through the roof, and yet, we still talk about it as if it is truly the best way for most people." Rowe says millions of American jobs don't require a college education. "I'm fascinated by the skills gap…But 5.6 million jobs that exist as we speak, (sic) 75% of which do not require a fouryear degree are sitting there." Did you get that? There are more job openings for skilled workers than graduates we are churning out of what we consider higher educational institutions! Rowe says putting an emphasis on college education sends many graduates into the work force saddled with high debt--and without skills that could have been acquired more affordably at vocational schools. Are we teaching young people that they are "too good" to do certain jobs that will probably pay them more for their skills in the long run? Wisner quotes Rowe, "We have this subordinate view of all kinds of different forms of education that lead to these opportunities, therefore, we have the same subordinate view of all these jobs that go begging." In a timely Youtube video, Rowe says, "I can think of 9 magazines who every year rank the top colleges… and none of them include a trade school! That's where the pressure on young people starts. While more young people are opting for four year degrees, trade jobs account for 54% of the labor market today." Ponder this: experts today are saying that 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled over the next ten years. But at the rate young people are coming out with a practical skill set, only 2 million of those jobs will be filled. A general liberal arts education won't teach you how to do the technical work these positions will require. Dawson, a friend's son, is about to enter school to study engineering. He knows that the future will require engineers in many fields. Oddly, jobs available in most of these areas account for more than 50% of openings today! At a four-year college, you may be "well- rounded" by a deeper understanding of the Zoroastrians, Chaucer and Greek Mythology, but at what price to your future ability to earn a living will be faced? Building The Future Joyce Rosenberg wrote recently, "Construction firms are having a hard time finding workers and expect the situation to persist over the next 12 months. That's the finding of a survey (Summer, 2017) by the Associated General Contractors of America and Autodesk." She said, "70% of construction firms, many of them small businesses, are having problems finding workers to fill hourly craft positions that are the majority of the construction workforce, according to the survey. 67% predicted it would be hard to fill positions over the next 12 months." "A worker shortage at companies could affect the amount of building activity in the U.S.," said Stephen Sandherr, CEO of the Contractors Group. "In the short-term, fewer firms will be able to bid on construction projects if they are concerned they will not have enough workers to meet demand." After decades of emphasizing bachelor's degrees the US and Canada need more tradespeople… in jobs that will pay more and at an escalating rate, than most traditional "white collar" jobs a student would apply for post-graduation. Mark Krupnick writes, "… so much effort has been put into encouraging high school graduates to go to college for academic degrees rather than for training in industrial and Ponder this: experts today are saying that 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will need to be filled over the next ten years. But at the rate young people are coming out with a practical skill set, only 2 million of those jobs will be filled. A general liberal arts education won't teach you how to do the technical work these positions will require. Continued on page 72

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