International Door & Operator Industry

NOV-DEC 2017

Garage door industry magazine for garage door dealers, garage door manufacturers, garage door distributors, garage door installers, loading docks, garage door operators and openers, gates, and tools for the door industry.

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To calculate headroom clearance, take the vertical frame height and add the radius. Let's say the frame height is 84" and the ceiling to floor headroom is 96". An 84" high door plus a 12" radius= 96" which would allow just enough space for the door and torsion spring assembly. If we take the 84" opening and add 15" for a 15" radius, we might want to use the two added = 99" but this would place the door too high. The bigger the radius the higher off the floor your door will be when fully opened. Working this in reverse I could say the floor to ceiling is 96" meaning if I want to install an 84" high door and use a 10 or 12" radius track it will fit (84+ 10 = 94/ 84+ 12=96). I now have 2 choices on radius that will place an opened door just under the ceiling. Since Hurricane Andrew there has been much emphasis placed on making garage doors stronger, so not to bow, but be able to withstand the extreme positive and negative pressures placed on the doors from high wind loads. After Hurricane Andrew the garage door became a focal point for the origin of many destroyed homes. It was discovered that when the garage door failed, wind came into the garage and pushed the roof up and away. Once the roof was gone the wind pushed down interior walls, and without the interior wall, wind could push over exterior walls from the inside. Positive pressure will push a garage door into the garage while negative pressure will pull a door out into the driveway; doors that meet wind load standards must be the best built in the world. In areas of extreme winds, the vertical track should be made with a heavier guage and have stronger jamb brackets so not to be deformed, being able to hold the door in place. The door panels should also be made with better reinforcement which must be sturdy enough so not to bow inward or outward. The most common residential track kits are designed to guide a 1.75"thick door which is an industry standard. When door sections are made in uncommon thicknesses, the track provider must be informed so you get the jamb brackets secured with the correct offset. I prefer bolted jamb brackets because you can loosen the bolts and adjust the verticle track in order to move the door closer or further from the jambs. From a manufacturer's point of view, spot welding may be the least costly, but it is messy and permanent, meaning you cannot make any adjustments afterwards. If you want to remove a spot weld, you must drill it out using a 1/4"or 5/16" drill bit and then hammer a chisel between the 2 pieces of steel. Excess welding matter will pop away, but there will be sharp burrs, so carry a grinder. There are some unexplained inconsistencies that began decades ago that can be confusing. For example, why is a two inch roller only 1.75 inches across? I believe it is known as 2" so people will know it will mate with 2" track. Even though there is no place on the 2" track where there is a 2" dimension. An exact 2" roller would never fit in a 2" track. Likewise, the rollers for 3" track are not 3" in diameter, but smaller. Homeowners and some door techs are totally oblivious to these dimensions. The garage door track profile can be described like describing a shoe. There is a toe, sole, and heel. Engineers in track production use these terms to describe problems with roll forming. When tooling begins to wear down, the toe is sometime rolled too tight and a roller may not slide easily. If you find a track incorrectly formed, you should use the terms mentioned to describe the issue when calling the track provider. (continued from page 37) TECHNICAL The garage door track profile can be described like describing a shoe. There is a toe, sole, and heel. Engineers in track production use these terms to describe problems with roll forming. When tooling begins to wear down, the toe is sometimes rolled too tight and a roller may not slide easily. If you find a track incorrectly formed, you should use the terms mentioned to describe the issue when calling the track provider. Continued on page 40 38 International Door & Operator Industryâ„¢

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