International Door & Operator Industry

MAY-JUN 2018

Garage door industry magazine for garage door dealers, garage door manufacturers, garage door distributors, garage door installers, loading docks, garage door operators and openers, gates, and tools for the door industry.

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22 International Door & Operator Industry™ Actually, you could say the use of torsion springs is a trend also. My father said "for the first 5 years of his door service, he only saw doors using extension springs. He was servicing doors for quite some time before seeing a torsion spring and that was on a commercial door. He also said he was scared to death of torsion springs until 1972 when he installed his first 16 x 7 door. If you find an extension spring has snapped, I recommend replacing both with two new ones. Usually the end loop fails first. If you are called to job where the homeowner has had issues with a thrown cable and the drums are the standard 400-8, you should replace the drums. Replacing the 400-8 drums with 400-12 or 400-13 will solve the problem of cables flopping off, simply because there will be more cable on the drum. Since the two drums have the same diameter you will not change the spring IPPT. If the drum grooves look worn, you should replace them also. Once again you can replace 400-7 or400-8 drums with the better, more reliable 400-12 or 400-13 drums. SAFETY: The top reason to contemplate the decision to repair or replace is Safety. With a one piece door there are a host of safety reasons to replace the system. In my opinion one piece doors should be replaced with a sectional door design anytime possible. When a spring breaks homeowners typically want the cheaper option which is to replace only one spring. A metallurgist and spring producers will say you must replace both even if only one broke. This is because springs are manufactured in batches that come from the same spool of wire. If there is a fault in the wire it possibly could be throughout the entire spool. Meaning there could be many springs made from the same faulted spool that end up being sold in a group. Another reason is oil-tempered springs are made in large batches and heat-treated in a large oven at the same time, so if there was a problem with the heat-treating process all the springs in that batch will be effected. The original 2 springs installed were most likely made on the same day from a common spool, and were heat-treated together so I tell people that if one failed the other will probably go soon. It's not a scam to try and charge more, but it is reality and will save the homeowner from the inevitable which is another service charge very soon. I will tell them the prices if I have to come back or doing it now and they usually submit and I will change both then. Many other components can pose a danger if broken or defective and usually cannot be repaired. Some door components have a certain operational life and must always be replaced and most likely cannot be repaired. Actually, it doesn't make any sense to try and repair the following items: HINGES, BEARINGS, ROLLERS, CABLES, OR BOTTOM AND TOP BRACKETS. Tracks are also sometimes damaged by collision. If you own a track anvil tool, you may be able to hammer a track back into shape, but even the homeowner would say replace it if you have it. There are very few repairs that can be done with a hammer, and homeowners typically do not approve of their parts being hammered. Likewise you should inspect all fasteners for tightness. If you find a stripped out or bent fastener you must replace it promptly. It doesn't make sense to bust a bearing out of a bearing bracket either. The time cost to swap out a bearing is costlier than buying a new bearing bracket. Just carry new brackets with good solid new bearings and be done with it. Be sure to replace any of the above with compatible better products. On the operator front it is always safer to replace. Replacement is highly recommended for residential operators or gate operators. Operator manufacturers who choose to comply with the Underwriters Laboratories Standard for Safety #325 have chosen to make their operators safer every year starting in 1986 when residential door operators had to provide some sort of load sensing to reverse the door upon obstruction. On early operators sensing an obstruction was typically done with a built-in mechanical device which sensed an opposing force. Residential and commercial operator types are covered in UL325 standard for safety and have changed many times in the past 25 years, so always upgrade to a newer safer operator and replace with the latest design any time possible. California, Minnesota, and New York have state laws prohibiting repair to an operator if it was built before 1993. The operator must be replaced with an operator that complies with UL 325 5 th edition. This edition went into effect 1/1/ 1993 and included the need for external entrapment TECHNICAL "Many other components can pose a danger if broken or defective and usually cannot be repaired. Some door components have a certain operational life and must always be replaced and most likely cannot be repaired. Actually, it doesn't make any sense to try and repair the following items: HINGES, BEARINGS, ROLLERS, CABLES, OR BOTTOM AND TOP BRACKETS." Continued on page 24 Continued from page 21 International Door & Operator Industry™ 22

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